AHEP Annual Conference 2024 Programme

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Sunday, 24 March 2024

Early Registration
Time: 16:00-17:30
Location: Registration and Information Desk, Warwick Arts Centre foyer


Welcome to AHEP: Your Professional Community

Join us for a warm and inclusive session at the AHEP Conference. Whether you’re a first-time attendee, new AHEP member, or simply seeking to expand your network, this session is designed to help you feel welcomed and connected within our vibrant community. Discover the resources, support, and opportunities available to you as a member of AHEP, and meet fellow professionals who share your passion for higher education. 

Learning Objectives:

– Gain a comprehensive understanding of AHEP, its mission, and the resources available to support professional development. 

– Develop networking skills and strategies to effectively connect with peers and mentors within the higher education sector. 

– Feel empowered and motivated to engage actively in the AHEP community, fostering ongoing professional growth and collaboration. 

Sunday, 24 March from 17:00-18:00


Sunday Social: Paint, Dine and Sip

This year, we have partnered with a local artist to bring Coventry to the conference. As part of our Sunday social, delegates will be working together to craft an extraordinary mural, offering you the perfect canvas to showcase your artistic side. This activity not only adds a touch of creativity but also provides a unique opportunity for you to take a piece of the conference home with you, capturing the spirit of Coventry. 

This social event will also host welcome drinks and a two-course buffet.

Sunday, 24 March from 18:00-21:00


Monday, 25 March 2024

Registration and Refreshments
Time: 08:30-09:15
Location: Registration and Information Desk, Warwick Arts Centre foyer

Keynote and Welcome Address: Matt Western, The Labour Vision for Higher Education
Time: 09:15-09:35
Location: Arts Centre Theatre, Warwick Arts Centre, 1st Floor

The Labour Vision for Higher Education

Matt Western, MP for Warwick and Leamington, Shadow Minister for Higher Education 

About the session

Join us for an illuminating keynote address by Shadow Minister for Higher Education, Matt Western, as he explores the dynamics of higher education in the face of political uncertainty.  

As a local MP for a region brimming with creative industries, Mr. Western provides a distinctive viewpoint on the significance of the higher education sector. With the upcoming general election, his address offers professional services staff a unique opportunity to glean insights into the Labour Party’s plans for a more sustainable and strategic higher education model. Following Mr. Western’s keynote address, an expert panel will convene to discuss and respond to the points raised. This session is essential for professionals across the sector, offering crucial perspectives to navigate the evolving higher education landscape and contribute to its strategic development.

About Matt

Matt Western is the Labour MP for Warwick and Leamington and is Labour’s Shadow Minister for Higher Education. Before his election in 2017, Matt worked for many years in industry, where he specialised in marketing, finance, and procurement. In March 2021, he was appointed Shadow Minister for Higher Education, leading Labour’s response to the Higher Education (Freedom of Speech) and Bills relating to the implementation of the Lifelong Loan Entitlement (LLE). He Chairs the All-Party Parliamentary Groups (APPG) for Electric Vehicles and Council Housing as well as the All-Party Moto Group (automotive). 

Panel Response: The Labour Vision for Higher Education
Time: 09:35-09:55
Location: Arts Centre Theatre, Warwick Arts Centre, 1st Floor

The Labour Vision for Higher Education Panellists

We will be releasing further panellists soon. Stay tuned for more information!

Debbie Mcvitty, Editor, Wonkhe

About Debbie

Debbie McVitty is editor of Wonkhe and is an experienced commentator on higher education policy. Debbie is interested in the social impact of HE, learning, teaching and curriculum, institutional change and innovation, and in bringing to light diverse and under-represented voices in the HE policy debate.  

She has previously worked in policy and communications roles at Universities UK, the University of Bedfordshire and the National Union of Students. She holds a DPhil in English Literature from the University of Oxford and an MRes in higher education research, evaluation and enhancement from Lancaster University. She is an honorary fellow of the School of Education at the University of Birmingham.

Andrew Westwood, Professor of Government Practice and Director, Productivity Institute, University of Manchester

About Andrew

Andy Westwood is Professor of Government Practice and a director of the Productivity Institute at the University of Manchester. He is a governor at NIESR and a board member at the University of Wolverhampton. He has also worked as an expert adviser to the EU, the IMF and the OECD and for the Economic Affairs Committee in the House of Lords. He worked as a special adviser to UK ministers on innovation, education and skills during the last Labour government. 


Working Session 1

Monday, 25 March from 10:00-11:00

Delegates can choose one working session per session slot excluding sessions where there are multiple sessions in a slot.

101: Making HE inclusive for transgender students (30 minute presentation)

(Please note, this session will be followed by the 30 minute session listed after this session)

Lynne Regan, Disability Adviser and Student Support & Wellbeing Manager, University of Kent

About the session:

My research into the experiences of transgender students in UK Higher Education explored how/whether their needs were being met by HEIs. Investigating themes around harassment, bullying and transphobia, representation in the curriculum, and institutional facilities and administration, the study identified changes needed to make HE a more inclusive environment for trans students. As HE professionals there are a number of things we can do – on both an individual and institutional level – to improve the experience of trans students. At a time of high media and political reporting about trans people, it is more important than ever to get this right.

My study aimed not just to make the experiences of trans students bearable, but to ensure they receive the same exciting and amazing experience that all HE students deserve. To do this, HEIs need to be ready for trans students, providing an affirming experience founded on understanding. As HE professionals we can influence decisions and policies that will support trans students. This presentation aims to inform about some of the issues faced by trans students, and address what we can do, as HE professionals, to champion inclusivity for this student group.

In my research, using a transformative paradigm with its emphasis on addressing issues of social injustice experienced by marginalised groups, I investigated the experiences trans HE students and the power imbalance of learning within a largely cisnormative environment, in order to inform practical change. A critical approach provided a powerful framework for understanding disparities as functions of power in education, within both the curriculum and the HE environment. An understanding of cisnormativity in HE and how this privileges cisgender students and makes it harder for trans students, is integral to bringing about change.

Through surveys and interviews with trans students in HE across the UK, this study identified how obstacles encountered by these students lead to feelings of segregation and otherness; it examined the lack of representation in the curriculum, and the particular impact this has when teaching professional health science subjects; it also looked at how the power of cisnormativity influences across student life, from administration and facilities, to the provision of suitable mental health services.

As HE professionals we have the ability and opportunity to question current policies and practices and to improve the experience of
trans students.

Conference Stream: Demonstrating responsible practice and personal integrity

This session fits into all of the conference streams. This includes, Engaging in the wider context, Demonstrating responsible practice and personal integrity, Being agile and adaptable and Working together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will appreciate the difficulties trans students experience in HE and identify the potential impact of these difficulties on attainment and retention, as well as on individual mental health and wellbeing.

– Delegates will understand the steps that HEIs need to take to improve inclusion of this student group and identify where change is needed in their own HEIs

– Delegates will identify how to become a better Ally to trans students and advocate for that change on behalf of a student group that is often overlooked.

101: Higher Diversity Coalition: Unlocking Ethnic Diversity in Academic and Student Services Leadership (30 minute presentation)

(Please note, this session will take place after the 30 minute session listed before this session)

Monika Nangia, Academic Registrar and Director of Student & Academic Services, Durham University

About the session:

This is a unique coalition of sector bodies – AHEP, ARC, AHUA, AMOSSHE, UHR, SCONUL and Shakespeare Martinau facilitated by Gatenby Sanderson – that has come together for the first time to raise awareness of the lack of ethnic diversity in senior leadership positions in the professional services within Higher Education. The coalition is working towards a four-point programme to not only highlight the challenges faced by colleagues in meeting their professional and career goals but also explore ideas that will break some of those barriers.

This is a presentation/workshop style session that will include elements of storytelling, which is considered a powerful form of conveying difficult messages with relative ease. As a passionate advocate for the advancement of women in leadership roles and actively championing the need for greater representation of individuals from minoritised ethnicities in leadership positions, I intend to represent this Coalition at the wild card session at AHEP

Conference Stream: Demonstrating responsible practice and personal integrity

This session fits into the following conference streams: Demonstrating responsible practice and personal integrity, Working together and Engaging in the wider context

Learning Objectives:

– Encourage senior colleagues to initiate a dialogue within their own organisations to raise awareness of the need to promote candidates from minoritised ethnicities in senior positions.

– Create regional networks of HE institutions to work towards improving ethnic diversity in senior leadership positions and share good practice in data collection, recruitment and retention and professional development.

– Delegates will share their personal journeys and empower others in their early careers to aspire to senior positions.

102: Using your network to drive process improvement (30 minute presentation)

(Please note, this session will be followed by the 30 minute session listed after this session)

Lesley O’Keeffe, Registrar, Brunel University London and Julie Kelly, Academic Registrar, University of Hertfordshire 

About the session:

Have you ever found yourself entangled in institutional procedures, trapped in the cycle of ‘But we’ve always done it this way’ or placing challenges in the ‘too difficult’ basket? In 2023, a group of colleagues united to address these challenges and enhance processes, embarking on a journey of learning from one another. 

This transformative initiative, termed a ‘show and tell,’ became a platform for colleagues from Brunel University London, University of Hertfordshire, and beyond to openly share their current status and the challenges they aimed to tackle. The inaugural event focused on Registration, a complex process impacting every student within our institutions, leading to subsequent successful events on various processes. 

This presentation, facilitated on behalf of the Academic Registrar Council (ARC), delves into these events, detailing their structure and effectiveness. Attendees will gain insights into the practical aspects of organizing their process improvement journey events and have the opportunity to pose questions. 

In alignment with the themes of ‘Being agile and Adaptable’ and ‘Working together,’ Lesley will draw on experiences to illustrate that the skills to enhance processes, often associated with Academic Registrars, are valuable and applicable to colleagues in all roles. Join us as we navigate the landscape of change and innovation in higher education amidst the backdrop of political uncertainty stemming from UK elections. 

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference streams: Working together and Being agile and adaptable.

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will be able to plan their own process improvement event. 

– Delegates will be able to enhance their working practice through alternative ways of process improvement 

– Delegates will understand how to integrate working with their network in other organisations with their day-to-day work to improve outcomes 

102: We Don’t Need No (Secondary/Further) Education? Applying lessons learnt from the post-pandemic secondary/further student experience (30 minute exploratory workshop)

(Please note, this session will take place after the 30 minute session listed after before session)

Jake Harding, Student Enrichment Manager, Manchester Metropolitan University 

About the session:

Engaging with the broader landscape of the education sector and collaborating with colleagues in secondary/further education aligns with the conference theme of navigating political uncertainty. Understanding and addressing crises in schools and colleges, such as issues related to absence, funding, recruitment, retention, and wellbeing, especially exacerbated by the pandemic, is crucial. This is essential not only for the immediate challenges faced by schools and colleges but also for the corresponding impact on higher education. The upcoming UK election holds significance as the resolution of these national issues is pivotal in alleviating pressures on colleagues and students.

The exploration and comprehension of pressures on secondary/further education colleagues and students are pertinent to professionals in higher education, given the emerging translational impacts affecting both sectors. The conference session aims to attract graduates and early-career professionals seeking insights into the post-pandemic secondary/further education student experience. Attendees can apply lessons learned to enhance the higher education student experience and network with like-minded professionals interested in student engagement, enrichment, and overall experience. The session will specifically address how we can influence our respective areas, both within and outside the institution, to collaboratively address broader issues and support student experience and career readiness.

The funding, recruitment, and retention crises in schools and colleges lead to reduced capacity for academic and pastoral support, concurrent increases in student absences, and poor wellbeing. The practice of grade inflation can effectively conceal poor academic performance, as evidenced during the pandemic. If not addressed, poor wellbeing can manifest as disengagement in higher education, both within and outside the curriculum, resulting in a subpar student experience and career readiness. As pressures persist, colleagues may face unsustainable demands on professional support service capacity.

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working together and Engaging with the wider context.

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will understand the pressures on secondary/further education colleagues and students. 

– Delegates will engage with the wider context of secondary and further education and how this translates as emerging trends in higher education

– Delegates will explore how different elements of the education sector can work together, both within and outside the institution, to address national issues and support the student experience. 

103: Strategies for moving into and succeeding in senior leadership roles (60 minute exploratory workshop)

Please note, this session is now fully booked. We will be repeating this session on Monday, 25 March from 14:35-15:35.

Hannah Rundle , Director of Faculty Operations (Humanities), University of Manchester

About the session:

Being agile and adaptable is key to moving into and succeeding in senior leadership roles. This session will look at the common challenges faced by leaders while applying for and transitioning into a new senior leadership role and share some strategies and ideas on succeeding in senior leadership roles, with thoughts and inputs collected from senior leaders across the sector. 

Building on this and linking to this year’s conference theme, the session will include reflections on the role of the senior leader in supporting their institution to continually adapt, thrive, and innovate regardless of the prevailing political landscape and how we might support our institutions to navigate the impact of UK elections on higher education. As well as some thoughts on the essential soft skills needed by senior managers to navigate the intricacies of organisational politics and how to navigate the multifaceted world of politics with a small ‘p.’ 

The session will encourage attendees to think creatively about their own personal experiences, encourage them to take ownership of their professional development in terms of succeeding in a senior leadership role as well as encouraging all participants to share their experiences and insights. 

There will be some honest and open reflections on how to thrive, not just survive! 

The topic will be of interest to HE professionals who are considering a move into a senior leadership role, or those who have recently moved into a senior leadership role. The workshop will provide some inputs, challenges and provocations to attendees as well as provide dedicated time for them to identify and reflect on the actions they need to personally take. 

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

The session will be guided by the AHEP values and link to the following areas of the AHEP professional development framework: Empowering professional development and Focusing on results and Taking Accountability 

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will engage with and sift through a range of ideas, reading and tips on transitioning into and succeeding in senior leadership roles and identify one or two areas they want to explore further.

– Delegates will reflect on their own personal journey into senior leadership roles and their priorities for their own personal practice to action following the conference.

– Delegates will have had an opportunity to network and engage with other aspiring or newly appointed senior leaders to share best practice and build their networks.

104: Harness Your Networks: How to Make the Most of AHEP and Other Professional Groups (60 minute exploratory workshop)

Please note, this session is now fully booked.

Nick Allen , Executive Officer, University of Northampton, Josh Gulrajani, Director of Planning, Performance, and Student Statutory Returns, Aston University

About the session:

How can you harness your networks to your own advantage? 

Whether you are a new AHEP member or an experienced member, this workshop will explore the different ways in which you can interact with AHEP and other networks which exist in higher education.  By harnessing your networks across and outside of higher education, you are able to share effective practice and better influence your own roles and institutions during periods of increased uncertainty and change, in order to ensure both you as an individual and your institution are able to thrive regardless of the prevailing political landscape. 

In your own institution, by harnessing internal networks across professional services and with academic departments, you are empowered and enabled to undertake your duties in a more fulfilled and effective way. The speakers will draw upon their own experiences of working in one institution for a sustained period of time, and as a relative newcomer to their institution to show how these internal networks have helped them succeed and thrive.   

For those attending their first conference, the session will provide an opportunity to explore how you can break those initial barriers to making a connection or building a network and identify groups which will ensure you get the maximum benefit from the time and effort being put in.   

The session will be interactive in nature, with delegates taking away an action plan to help harness their existing and likely future networks. 

Conference Stream: Engaging with the wider context

This session fits into the following conference stream: Engaging with the wider context.

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will explore the different ways in which members can interact with AHEP 

– Delegates will identify and describe other higher education networks and organisations 

– Delegates will recognise the different ways to undertake and the benefits of effective networking 

105: The development of a student customer relationship management approach to the student lifecycle (60 minute presentation/case study)

Emma Hewitt, Director of Student Administration, Imperial College London, James Hardy, Head of Student User Experience, Imperial College London

About the session:

Imperial College London is embarking on a new strategic and digital transformation on our student lifecycle. The College is moving towards a holistic approach to proactive student support through the development of a new student customer relationship management system and away from a complex, manual and distributed model.

The College is developing a 360 degree view of student support to provide pre-emptive and proactive support to its students, whilst ensuring a user centred rather system approach to development. The presentation will include what a CRM is and why it is important. This will be followed with some guidance on how to approach a user centric approach to a complex system. There will be opportunity to look at the development of a stakeholder map and understand the basics of business process mapping as well as Q&A as part of the session.  

The presentation will include our journey of discovery through to the planned roadmap of implementation; how a student CRM can support strategic and national drivers; where we are on the journey (at the point of the conference); key considerations from a business change perspective and lessons learnt so far; key outcomes and areas to consider for a CRM – thinking beyond the functional aspects of the student journey; how we have taken a user centric approach from our staff through to our students. 

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference streams: Being agile and adaptable, Engaging in the wider context, Demonstrating responsible practice and personal integrity and Working together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will explore key considerations and approaches when developing a solution for a distributed HE model. 

– Delegates will understand key aspects of a student CRM (not applicant CRM) 

– Delegates will identify the lessons learnt from this project

106: Engaging engagement for working together (60 minute wild card)

Ali Hanbury, Senior Engagement Officer, University of Manchester/National Centre for Research Methods

About the session:

Developing skills to identify, approach and collaborate with a multitude of stakeholders is essential within higher education and collaboration will help us respond to political uncertainty. With most potential stakeholders being ‘time poor’, deciding how we as higher education professionals create opportunities that will cultivate interest and expertise of others is an important skill. As NCRM’s first Senior Engagement Manager, I have developed and implemented a range of engagement activities and events since 2020, and in the spirit of working together, I’d like to host a collaborative ‘campfire’ to tease out some issues and provide examples to help develop practice.

This collaborative ‘campfire’ will focus on the ways in which we can connect to and influence stakeholders both inside and outside of higher education. In our increasingly complex sector, we have to negotiate and navigate professional relationships with diverse groups of people including policy-makers, (local) governments, commercial partners and the charity sector. This session will involve examples from my own stakeholder engagement practice (note: this is not ‘public engagement’), as well as the opportunity for delegates to reflect upon and share their own examples with the aim of being encouraged and empowered to find solutions for ourselves. 

I am a relationships-first senior leader who has worked in a local authority, the charity sector and most recently higher education. Over my 20+ year career I have developed my practice of stakeholder engagement, which includes with the Government’s Equalities Office, Department of Education, and various local and regional authorities. As such this collaborative ‘campfire’ will draw upon insight and expertise from my professional practice. From my most recent role (NCRM, since 2020), I will utilise my strategic planning and execution to inform the content of the session, sharing ideas for activities and events to create engaging engagement. 

Relationships are a central tenet of effective stakeholder engagement. Having a clear set of strategic priorities helps to assess engagement capacity and resource allocation will help make the work manageable. Understanding the agendas and priorities of others, as well as how they like to be communicated with, is key. Being clear about the benefits of engagement for stakeholders has helped me create successful initiatives, which will be shared during the ‘campfire’. Finally, no matter how hard you try, some people will simply not engage with you or your offer. 

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working together

Learning Objectives

– Delegates will understand ways of developing stakeholder relationships.

– Delegates will apply new insight to working together through engagement activities.

– Delegates will feel inspired to engage stakeholders in their work

107: We are in it together: delivering an effective and inclusive solution for student employability (60 minute case study)

Parmjit Dhugga, Warwick Award Manager, University of Warwick, Ali Collins, Head of Skills, University of Warwick, Alex Johnson, HE Sector Lead, GradIntelligence

About the session:

The Warwick Award, launched in October 2023, is an institution-wide student employability skills award at the University of Warwick. During this session, we will explain how, within a 12-month period, Warwick was able to design, develop and implement a new institutional award that engaged over 12,500 students during the first academic year of deployment. The session will explain how this was achieved by deploying a collaborative and innovative sprint-based process that accelerated the development of the award delivery platform with our collaborators, GradIntelligence.  

The case study will be followed by a group discussion focusing on the challenges that others are facing, the emerging issues that are changing the employability landscape, the different approaches other universities are taking to students’ employability, and the ways in which student’s engagement with their own employability can be maintained over the entirety of their time with us.  

With less than a year to go until the next election, this session is timely because the election could shape the future of the employability and skills sector. Priorities of the next government are likely to be very different. The Conservatives are considering introducing minimum service levels in universities to combat quality concerns with the PM pledging to stop universities offering ‘low value, rip-off degrees.’ The Education Secretary has also reiterated that ‘university is not the only option’, promising that the Conservatives will seek to deliver a lifelong learning revolution. Alternatively, the Labour Party intends to encourage growth by transforming existing training to address skills demands in the local economy, and new innovations in how education will be assessed to ensure they meet national strategic priorities for economic growth and reskilling. The Labour Party also intends to establish a new body, Skills England, which will become responsible for bringing ‘leadership and ambition’ to England’s skills system and reforming the Apprenticeship Levy into a Growth and Skills Levy. 

The session is relevant to the interests of senior university staff who are responsible for leading the development of new ideas to address strategic objectives. The session will also be of interest to mid-level managers who are responsible for the implementation of new institution wide initiatives. The session will have a wider appeal for university staff who are interested in supporting students’ employability and personal skills development and embedding employability skills in the curriculum.  This may include personal tutors and members of staff with a remit that includes student experience or employability. 

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will understand how to identify and enhance the teaching of employability skills within the curriculum.

– Delegates will learn how to engage large volumes of students in the development, recognition, and reflection on their own
employability skills.

– Delegates will be able to discuss the collaborative system development approaches that can be taken to support students’
skills development and career readiness at their institutions.

108: Is there a doctor in the house?: Doctoral studies for Professional Services Staff, is it for you? (60 minute presentation/panel)

Jonathan Dempsey, Head of Student Support and Access , Richmond American University London, Charlotte Verney, Head of Assessment, University of Bristol, Emily Maddock-Khan, Head of College Services, University of Nottingham International College 

About the session:

Is a doctorate just for those in academia, or should professional staff also dive into research? And if so … 

– How much time does it really take? 

– Can you manage it with a full-time job and full-time life? 

– What kind of topics can you explore? 

– And most importantly, is the effort and time worth the outcome? 

Join us as we share our personal stories of doctoral studies and aim to address these questions. 

In this session, each of us shares our personal research journeys, discussing how we balance research with our jobs and day to day lives. 

We will also include insights from peers in the sector who are undertaking or have completed their doctoral studies, sharing some of their own experiences. 

Beyond these practical questions, we will also share our “why” of doing doctoral studies. How it has helped us to engage beyond our own specialisms and engage with the wider HE community, to see how our seemingly small areas of interest impact the bigger picture, and how we adapt to the ever changing political and cultural landscape.  

We’ll wrap up with a Q&A session, giving you a chance to see if this might be a journey you’d want to take. 

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference streams: Engaging in the wider context and Being agile and adaptable

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will gain insight into how current professional services staff have successfully integrated doctoral studies into their careers , highlighting strategies for balancing research commitments with professional responsibilities

– Delegates will explore potential research areas and the challenges and rewards inherent in juggling academic and professional roles

– Delegates will assess the potential benefits of doctoral studies, both in terms of personal development and enhancement of professional skills, aiding them in informed decision-making about their academic futures. 

109: Using Lean Thinking to prepare for the future (60 minute facilitated discussion/activity)

Luke Phillimore, Associate Director of Change, University of Nottingham, Steve Harris, Senior Lead Practitioner, University of Nottingham, Kieran Wilkinson, Lean Practitioner, University of Nottingham

About the session:

Universities are living systems with multiple interacting parts, influenced by internal and external factors. With the upcoming General Election and the potential for further change coming, understanding the current ways of working is essential to be able to navigate the future.

Lean Thinking is now prevalent in the Higher Education sector with a thriving network of Lean HE professionals nationally and internationally – more and more universities are looking to Lean to give them the answers for how to adapt and improve ways of working. Fundamentally Lean is based on two principles, Respect for People and Continuous Improvement and this session will give a brief introduction to the methodology before focussing on two core Lean Thinking tool kits:


1) standardisation – “without standards there can be no Kaizen” Taiichi Ohno


The session will reflect on what standards are, where do we see them and why they are important in navigating change and answer questions such as “What did Ohno mean when he said that standards were essential for improvement?”


2) problem solving through PDCA – “stamping out fires is a lot of fun, but it is only putting things back the way they were” W. Edwards Deming

The second part of the session will consider problem solving through the lens of a takeaway tool for you to use – Plan, Do, Check, Act has been used widely to ensure that root causes of problems are addressed. You will get the chance to practice this method.

Finally you will get the chance to think about how to take the learning away and apply it into your own context, ensuring you, your teams and institutions are ready for the fun that 2024 is going to bring.

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference streams: Engaging in the wider context and Being agile and adaptable

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will understand why standards are important in making an institution resilient

– Delegates will apply a PDCA (Plan Do Check Act) to solve a problem

– Delegates apply learning to their own context

110: Thriving in turbulent times: the agile mindset (60 minute exploratory workshop)

Helen Curtis, School Manager, University of Bristol Imogen Debonnaire, Senior Executive Assistant, University of Bristol

About the session:

“The world today is every bit as turbulent as the storm… Leaders and their organisations, must have the ability to respond creatively to unpredictable challenges and opportunities. The need for agility has never been greater” (Oliver et al. 2021). 

This workshop will explore the theme of being agile and adaptable and will help delegates to understand how they can adopt an agile business model to thrive in turbulent times, seeing problems as opportunities for creative thinking and innovation. 

Organisations who are adopting agile working practices have a 75% chance of success with only a 30% success rate for those that don’t (McKinsey, 2021). Businesses all over the globe are adopting more agile approaches, such as flatter structures, smaller teams, and empowering staff at the lowest level. In contrast, higher education (HE) is a sector steeped in tradition, highly regulated with hierarchies and bureaucracy strongly embedded. How do we as leaders help our organisations transition to being agile, to ensure successful service delivery in this changing climate? 

This workshop will begin with an overview of agile leadership and embedding the agile business model, using a case-study approach to provide practical examples of how to apply agile approaches to improve service delivery. The case will be on changes made in a Medical School to support career development, meet evolving operational demands whilst underpinning the organisations values of EDI and sustainability. The speaker will introduce the concepts of agile working and share their own journey on developing an agile mindset.  

Drawing on the literature on agile leadership and business models, delegates will build an understanding of basic theory and how to apply it in their context. Examples will include embedding job-shares to support women progressing, the introduction of the apprentice scheme to increase social mobility and introducing the first sustainability technician in the UK. By using practical examples of theory applied in a HE setting, delegates will be able to translate agile leadership into their everyday, through creative thinking. Delegates will then have a group discussion on how to embed agile working into their own context. 

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference streams: Being agile and adaptable and Working Together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will build a basic understanding of agile leadership as a business model and understand how to apply it in their local context.

– Delegates will reflect on their own leadership/ management journey and explore how to move forward to embrace an agile mindset. 

– Delegates will explore how agile principles can be applied in a Higher Education setting and will have practical steps to take away with them.

Activity and Refreshment Break
Time: 11:00 – 11:40
Location: Mead Gallery and Warwick Arts Centre foyer

Plenary: In conversation with…Jisc. AI in HE: Revolutionising tomorrow or lagging behind today?
Time: 11:40 – 12:20
Location: Arts Centre Theatre, Warwick Arts Centre, 1st Floor

In conversation with…Jisc. AI in HE: Revolutionising tomorrow or lagging behind today?

Liam Earney, Managing Director of Higher Education and Research, JISC 

About the session:

In this thought-provoking conference plenary, we delve into the transformative potential of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and digital services in addressing the myriad challenges facing the UK higher education sector. As institutions grapple with evolving landscapes, our focus is on presenting actionable insights for professionals working in various roles within higher education professional services.

We will explore the opportunities for reform and reinvention that AI and digital services bring and unravel the ways in which these technologies can serve as powerful tools for navigating the complexities of the contemporary higher education environment. Our expert speaker, Liam Earney, Managing Director HE and Research, Jisc, will share invaluable advice on adapting policies to integrate AI tools effectively and respond adeptly to emerging issues.

About Liam:

Liam Earney is Managing Director of Higher Education and Research at Jisc, where he has occupied a variety of roles over the last 20 years in strategy, product development, vendor negotiations and member engagement. His responsibilities include ensuring that Jisc is developing its portfolio based on a deep understanding of the priorities and challenges facing universities, overseeing the negotiations that Jisc undertakes with a variety of commercial and non-commercial vendors and publishers across teaching & learning, research and operations, its range of research management services, its digital transformation work and finally, its engagement with individual universities, helping them get the most from their Jisc membership. 

AHEP Awards
Time: 12:20 – 12:40
Location: Arts Centre Theatre, Warwick Arts Centre, 1st Floor

Lunch and Networking
Time: 12:40 – 13:30
Location: Mead Gallery and Warwick Arts Centre foyer


Working Session 2

Monday, 25 March from 13:30-14:30

Delegates can choose one working session per session slot excluding sessions where there are multiple sessions in a slot.

201: A guide to compliance with the Higher Education (Freedom of Speech) Act 2023 delivered by Doyle Clayton (30 minute presentation)

(Please note, this session will be followed by the 30 minute session listed after this session)

James Murray, Research Fellow, University of Birmingham and Legal Director at Doyle Clayton, Joanne Clement KC, Barrister, 11 KBW

About the session:

In 2023, the Higher Education (Freedom of Speech) Act became law. In short, the Act introduces a range of enhanced and new duties for providers with respect to free speech on campus and academic freedom, as well as new conditions of registration which will be monitored by a new Director at the OfS and a new complaints scheme similar to the existing Office of the Independent Adjudicator scheme. 

The Act will apply to all English Universities and their constituent institutions and has mandatory action points to ensure proper compliance. Therefore, understanding the Act’s implications and requirements is essential for all higher education professionals. Furthermore, the new enforcement mechanisms – especially the new complaints scheme – will mean that free speech issues will increasingly come across the desk of higher education professionals. 

The compliance impact is wide-ranging and complex in terms of both issues and documentation: 

  1. Issues covered include the organisation of speaking events, but also how employment arrangements are managed – in particular the recruitment, promotion, discipline and dismissal of academic staff. 
  1. Documentation covered includes management arrangements, governing documents (statutes, ordinances, bye-laws, etc.), free speech policies and codes, recruitment policies, harassment and disciplinary policies, settlement agreements, and funding arrangements. 

The presentation will give a user-friendly overview of the new Act and the complex area of law. The session will be very practical in its focus – giving suggestions for best practice, highlighting risk areas and mitigation strategies in an easy to understand and accessible way.

Conference Stream: Engaging with the wider context

This session fits into the following conference stream: Engaging in the Wider Context

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will understand what the new law requires of providers

– Delegates will be provided with Practical steps to ensure Day 1 compliance with the new law.

– Delegates will be provided with strategies for ensuring ongoing compliance with the law

201: Tackling staff recruitment challenges in Higher Education:  An Academy approach (30 minute presentation)

(Please note, this session will take place after the 30 minute session listed before this session)

Claire Smith, Head of Faculty Student Education Operations and Doctoral College, University of Leeds

About the session:

Retaining staff in the higher education landscape continues to be extremely challenging for most of us. The changes of the way we work and the ongoing pressures on HE means that we have had little time to onboard, induct, and develop staff.

This session is designed to provide a case study from the University of Leeds of a tried and tested approach used previously in the finance and civil service sector. It will explain the approach taken to reviewing the current recruitment strategy, how we have developed and implemented the Grade 4 Academy, and exploring a longer term development plan to provide a pathway to Grade 5 at the University of Leeds.

The Grade 4 Academy initiative has helped to address some of the challenges faced from high levels of staff turnover, as well as providing support across a busy academic year, and reducing the need to utilise temporary resource to meet demand. It will demonstrate how an academy approach can improve diversity of the workforce, develop peer groups, and assist in workforce planning. This session will provide insight into how to develop a training plan that ensures a sense of belonging and community, embeds a positive team culture, contains a bespoke set of training resources, and builds an enthusiasm for a career in higher education.

The session will also include an opportunity to discuss challenges at their own institution and consider how they could utilise the model used by University of Leeds.

Conference Stream: Engaging with the wider context

This session fits into the following conference stream: Engaging in the Wider Context

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will reflect on what would work well within their own Institutional culture

– Delegates will be able to take back ideas to their own institutions with reference to the experience of other participants

– Delegates will gain a clear understanding of how creating a sense of belonging amongst new staff and embedding a culture of developing staff

202: Navigating a VUCA world with Automation (60 minute exploratory workshop)

Clare Baxter, Process Automation Manager, University of Bath

About the session:

In an era of profound uncertainty and rapid change, the integration of automation technologies stands as a beacon of empowerment for professional services staff. This workshop-style session delves into the transformative potential of automation, particularly through Power Automate, addressing the imperative need for higher education institutions to change and innovate amidst a country in flux.

As professional services staff, we have all witnessed first-hand the critical need to adapt swiftly. If we leverage automation tools, we have the potential to drive productivity, enhance efficiency, and the capability for us to navigate evolving situations – even in a VUCA world – within our dynamic higher education landscape. Moving forward, continued integration of automation and ongoing digital skill development will be paramount to further strengthen the sector’s adaptability and effectiveness amidst unpredictable political shifts.

This session offers invaluable insights for colleagues seeking to optimise their time at work and streamline processes.

Delegates will discover practical ways to tackle operational challenges exacerbated by political uncertainties and attendees will leave feeling inspired about how automation, specifically Power Automate and its associated AI tools, can be harnessed in their university settings.
We’ll explore the pivotal question: How can technology fortify our effectiveness in an ever-shifting landscape? This session promises tangible strategies and engaging insights that will make professionals across the sector eager to utilise technology’s transformative potential in their roles and to drive positive change – even when we don’t know exactly what those challenges might be yet!

Through case studies and interactive discussions, attendees will examine automation’s impact on efficiency and adaptability within the higher education context. We’ll explore real-world scenarios, exploring how automation optimises workflows and empowers professionals to navigate uncertain environments. Insights gleaned from these discussions will highlight the critical role of technology in fortifying institutions against political volatility, inspiring attendees to integrate automation to enhance personal effectiveness and organisational resilience.

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference stream: Being agile and adaptable

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will cultivate strategies to leverage automation, enhancing personal effectiveness by streamlining tasks, managing time efficiently, and adapting swiftly to dynamic circumstances within higher education settings.

– Delegates will explore the expansive possibilities of technology, enabling them to envision and implement innovative solutions within their roles. They’ll gain insights into how automation can revolutionise workflows and open new avenues for problem-solving in higher education.

– Delegates will develop the ability to critically evaluate existing processes within their institutions. They’ll gain tools and frameworks for assessing the suitability of automation solutions, fostering a culture of continuous improvement and refinement in response to evolving challenges.

203: Engaging Agility : Experience -Scrum and Kanban, Agile Frameworks through active simulations (Session 1) (60 minute wild card)

Please note, there is a second part of this session taking place in working session three. There is no requirement to attend both, however, they will be linked.

Karl Royle, Agile Coach, University of Nottingham, Taidhgh O’Regan, Product Director, University of Nottingham

About the session:

Agile ways of working are designed to respond to change during times of uncertainty and they advocate responding to change over following a plan. As such they are ideally placed to respond to political uncertainty and allowing fast pivoting to navigate the impact of external events. In the commercial world they are used to respond to competition and changes in the market conditions.

This session introduces the agile framework – Scrum through a hands-on interactive simulation. As the agile concept goes beyond software into university professional practice this session gives delegates an insight into self-organising teams and responding to change in a fast-moving environment. 

In this session, we will highlight the fundamentals of agility, drawing on the context of our Education, Administration, and Continuous Improvement team. Delegates will actively learn about agile values and principles by taking part in a Scrum team and experiencing the roles and events in Scrum practice.

The session will also have a series of cheat sheets and takeaways alongside instructions on how to run the simulations in their own contexts. 

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference streams: Being agile and adaptable and Working together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will experience a Scrum simulation, self organisation, prioritisation by value and teamworking through inspection and adaption
(self improvement)

– Delegates will develop a product and use Kanban to manage its production – including the principles and practices of Kanban through
group interaction and a worked example/simulation.

– Delegates will identify agile principles and frameworks, reflect on their potential use and plan an agile experiment within their institutions

204: Using Project Management techniques to weather the stormy Higher Education seas (60 minute facilitated discussion)

Amy Manktelow, Planning and Projects Manager, Nottingham Trent University

About the session:

Managing projects within an ever changing higher education landscape can feel like steering a ship in stormy seas. It can leave you, as a higher education practitioner, wondering what way is north and even if we knew, would we ever get there?

This session is designed to empower attendees to navigate project management within higher education, whether they are new to managing projects or have been doing it a while. The session will take Project Management techniques and demonstrate how you can adapt your project planning and the way in which you operationalise your projects to become stronger against the changes and challenges within the sector. The session will firstly walk attendees through how to ensure that projects are strategically focused to get sustainable and effective stakeholder engagement and backing.

Secondly, it will demonstrate how collaborative working across institutions and the sector can strengthen projects to political change.

Thirdly, it will give practical project management tools that you can take away to apply to your own projects, including templates for delegates to take away and use in their own practice.

The purpose of the presentation is to give delegates the practical knowledge of how to better manage their projects, whilst being strategically aligned, and whilst delivering service excellence in their own institutions by having more rigorous project management processes and practices.

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference stream: Being agile and adaptable

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will describe core project management techniques and how they could support their work in their day to day roles

– Delegates will acquire tools to appraise their own projects and identify what areas could be bettered by a more structured project management approach.

– Delegates will understand how to formulate sustainable and efficient project plans within the context of their roles.

205: Meet the SIGs (60 minute facilitated discussion)

AHEP’s Special Interest Group (SIG) Coordinators including coordinators from the following SIGs: Governance, Student Experience and Engagement, Change, Operations, Independent Providers, Equity, Diversity and Inclusion, and Quality and Standards

About the session:

Join us for an engaging and interactive working session at this year’s conference, delivered by AHEP’s Special Interest Group (SIG) coordinators. This session is designed to provide an opportunity for attendees to meet, interact, and share experiences with coordinators leading various Special Interest Groups.  

Whether you’re a current SIG member or looking for further insight into AHEP’s SIGs, this session offers an inclusive space to explore common challenges, exchange best practices, and build lasting connections with professionals who share similar roles and interests. 

Conference Stream: Engaging with the wider context

This session fits into the following conference stream: Engaging with the wider context

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will engage with dedicated HE professionals in a variety of specialist fields

– Delegates will expand their network and leave this session with a strong sense of community

– Delegates will recognise the purpose of AHEP’s SIGs, identify the current SIGs and how new SIGs are established

206: Third space professionals – reflecting on a squiggly career path (60 minute facilitated discussion)

Emelie Helsen, Campus Manager, CU London – Coventry University Group, Jonathan Dempsey, Head of Student Support and Access, Richmond American University London, Maisha Islam, Doctoral College Research Culture Lead (EDI), University of Southampton

About the session:

In an ever-changing and often uncertain HE landscape, influenced by COVID and lockdowns, political decisions, and social factors, disruption has presented itself to our roles and overall career paths. As university staff, we are increasingly questioning our positions, values and specialisms. Additionally, with a legacy of chiasm between academic and professional roles, new areas of work or fields of practice are added to university portfolios. Not only do our roles need to respond to the wider context, but our personal circumstances can change our future career trajectory, leaving us questioning what space there is for ‘generalists’ or ‘third space professionals’.  

We aim to illustrate how, as higher education professionals, we have navigated the dynamic nature of our careers by embracing a third space within our professional roles. Our intentional efforts to broaden our perspectives, stay adaptable, and accommodate personal changes have enabled us not only to thrive but also to contribute towards fostering a more just higher education community. We advocate for the recognition and value of third space professionals, shedding light on the strategies to navigate a fulfilling career that may be unconventional but is a source of pride for us.

During our facilitated discussion, we, as three presenters with over 20 years of experience in higher education, will respond to predetermined questions. Drawing from our lived experiences, we will explain the intentional steps we’ve taken – whether upward, downward, or sideways – the diverse qualifications we’ve pursued, and the vulnerabilities we’ve faced in responding to assumptions within and outside the higher education sector. Our aim is to emphasise that a holistic professional is well-positioned to advocate for and take action towards socially just universities. To complement our insights, we will integrate existing research on this topic (Stoltenkamp, van de Heyde & Siebrits, 2016; Whitchurch, 2008, 2018).

While our conclusions are ongoing, we stress the importance of reflexive practice in understanding personal needs alongside the requirements of potential roles and future career steps. Throughout the discussion, we will candidly share our experiences on the squiggly paths we’ve taken (referencing Tupper, H. and Ellis, H.) to inspire others and contribute to the development of a more democratic and inclusive staff workforce in higher education. We also invite input from those who have pursued or are considering similar paths, exploring potential barriers they may encounter.

Conference Stream: Demonstrating responsible practice and personal integrity

This session fits into the following conference streams: Demonstrating responsible practice and personal integrity and Being agile and adaptable

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will explore divergent career paths within HE globally  

– Delegates will reflect on their needs and wants in their career path  

– Delegates will consider how to have an agile career in HE or HE adjacent that works for them and an ever-changing environment

207: Capitalising on collaboration – how to build thriving communities of practice in higher education (60 minute facilitated discussion)

Sophie Crouchman, Strategic Projects and Research Manager, Emma Brookes, Strategic Projects and Research Manager, Universities Human Resources (UHR)

About the session:

With challenges ranging from staff recruitment to financial constraints and constant change, working in HE is as difficult as it has ever been, and with the expectation of a shift in the political landscape in 2024, how can professional services staff develop and thrive at work whilst preparing themselves for this change? Join us to learn more about how Universities HR (UHR) enable and equip our members to respond to legislative changes in partnership with their professional services colleagues, and how you can learn from our approach and apply it to your own area of work.

We all know that by working together, we can achieve more than the sum of our parts, however many universities remain siloed workplaces. Time and resources are precious, but by bringing colleagues together to share diverse experiences and perspectives, we can proactively address the challenges we’re facing. In this session, we will explore how the political landscape and government policy impact HE and employment, how UHR supports its members to tackle HR’s big issues in collaborative and constructive ways and challenge you to break down barriers in your own institution as HE faces an uncertain future.  

We will discuss the three main political parties’ manifestos as they relate to the world of work, as well as present a diverse range of projects, research and case studies that UHR has been involved in during the last two years to demonstrate the power of collaboration. Delegates will discuss how, by working together, professional services colleagues can make impactful changes and adapt to new ways of working in response to legislation and policy that may impact their own areas of work or their roles as people managers.  

We will cover several practical examples of working in partnership that have been undertaken by both UHR and our members, we will describe the changes that have been made as a result of these projects and will outline the key learning points. Delegates will consider and discuss the political landscape and the challenges they are facing as a result of this. They will also consider and discuss how they can reach out within their own organisations to break down barriers and work collaboratively – developing their own skills at the same time as transforming policy, practice and processes. 

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working together and Being agile and adaptable

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will identify the untapped potential for connection and collaboration within and beyond your organisation. 

– Delegates will explore other organisations that are capitalising on collaboration to respond to the challenges in our sector presented by a changing political landscape

– Delegates will assess the opportunities that exist for you and gain concrete takeaways on how to thrive in communities of practice. 

208: Sharing Best Practice: Insights from Higher Education Professionals’ Research into Sector Developments (60 minute presentation)

Dr Hulya Oztel, Course Leader, Nottingham Trent University, Angela Jones-Evans, College Team Leader, University Library Service, Cardiff University, David Meech Mazumdar, Department Manager – Strategic Planning and Development, The London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), Laura Yetton, Apprenticeships Programmes Manager, University of Warwick

About the session:

This session illustrates how Nottingham Trent University and AHEP, through their collaborative provision of the Higher Education Administration, Management and Leadership course, enable HE professionals to engage with the wider context and generate sector leading research that exemplifies how HE can pioneer through political uncertainty. We showcase findings and recommendations from three award-winning research dissertations.

With her work titled ‘Seeing the bigger picture: an investigation into the impact of process mapping on the management of change in a university library’, Angela Jones-Evans examines the impact of process mapping on the management of change in an academic library. Subject Librarians were brought together for an action research study to develop process maps, identify problem areas and generate potential solutions. The process mapping exercise was analysed against established change models to determine its impact on change management. The data demonstrates that process maps used in an action learning setting are impactful in terms of demonstrating readiness for change, showing where change needs to take place and creating a vision for what changes are required. The approach shared in the paper (combining process mapping and action research) is transferable to a range of HE settings where change is needed.

David Meech Mazumdar’s research, titled ‘The Phoenix is rising! How Professional Services leadership roles are evolving in academic units to shape the modern university’ provides a qualitative exploration of the evolvement of leadership roles in higher education academic units. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with PS leaders working in Academic Units (AU) across the sector.
Findings suggest that documented tensions between academics and Higher Education Professionals (HEPs) have lessened with the focus shifting to ‘local’ and ‘central’ relationship difficulties, often as a result of centralisation. With identity emerging as an important consideration for HEPs, the paper calls for a sector wide review of structures and resource allocation models, strategic clarity and the development of a new HEP apprenticeship scheme which the findings from this study hope to influence.

Laura Yetton’s paper titled ‘Enhancing Employer Co-Creation in Research-Intensive UK Universities: Challenges, Opportunities, and Recommendations’, considers ways in which Higher Education Institutions can work in partnership with industry in the area of work-based learning. The primary objective of the research is to discern the key challenges and opportunities associated with fostering employer co-creation within a UK research intensive higher education institution.

Drawing from empirical research, encompassing interviews with departmental staff responsible for engaging with industry within a prominent UK research intensive HEI, this paper identifies seven categories of recommendations. The primary recommendation is the advocacy for UK HEIs to cultivate a culture of innovation and collaboration. By fostering robust industry partnerships, institutions can fortify employer co-creation efforts, to gain maximum benefits for all stakeholders

Conference Stream: Engaging in the wider context

This session fits into the following conference streams: Engaging in the wider context, Being agile and adaptable and Working together

Learning Objectives:

– By the end of the session delegates will be able to gain new insights and understanding of the use of process mapping and action learning sets in initiating a change initiative

– By the end of the session delegates will be able to gain new insights and understanding of the challenges Higher Education Professionals experience in the management of Academic Units

– By the end of the session delegates will be able to gain new insights and understanding of the challenges and opportunities associated with fostering employer co-creation in a work based learning environment

209: Effective Collaboration for Social Change: Working Effectively With Your Students’ Union/Association (60 minute exploratory workshop)

Ashley Storer-Smith, Student Voice Manager, University of Nottingham Students’ Union

About the session:

Students’ Unions have led the charge on social change and activism for many years, from South African Apartheid, Gay Rights, transgender inclusivity, and decolonisation of the curriculum.

As a member led organisation, students lead the political steering with staff acting as civil servants. This unique structure and engagement method is a great opportunity to effectively engage students with social & civic change. This session will give an overview of the key structures and engagement methods of Students’ Unions to help participants learn about how they can adapt their structures to better engage students with this work.

This session will also focus on how academic and professional staff can effectively engage with their Students’ Union/Association/Guild; creating unique opportunities for collaboration so that they can enact social change together. This workshop will help support colleagues with idea generation with the unique student-led perspective as well as how to effectively approach the Union whilst ensuring a student-led perspective to their work.

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working together

Learning Objectives:

– To explore how Students’ Unions work when it comes to social justice and change making through their unique democratic
structures and systems and how to utilise this within their own work.

– To examine how to approach conversations around collaborative change with their local students’ union

– To develop key initial ideas on what they can collaborate on with their local Students’ Union


Working Session 3

Monday, 25 March from 14:35-15:35

Delegates can choose one working session per session slot excluding sessions where there are multiple sessions in a slot.

301: Specialist institutions – exploring interest for establishing a new Special Interest Group (30 minute exploratory workshop)

(Please note, this session will be followed by the 30 minute session listed after this session)

Jill Holliday, Head of Registry Services and Associate Academic Registrar, University of the Arts London 

About the session:

This session will bring together colleagues who currently work in specialist Higher Education Institutions across the UK. The needs of our communities are often different and present their own challenges both in scale and in the nature of what and how we teach our students. I would like to invite colleagues from this area to join a short discussion to gauge the appetite for establishing a SIG within AHEP to help us share best practice and solve the challenges that our specialist delivery brings. 

Specialist institutions have their own challenges in terms of delivery. It would be beneficial for the staff working in those areas to have a network of colleagues to reach out to when they are struggling with particular challenges – or more positively when they have some best practice they are keen to share to benefit the wider community. The session in this way will link to conference theme four – Working Together.  

The session will broadly engage with all of the conference themes. The broad context of arts education in the UK for example is impacting on a number of institutions as well as the creative sector in terms of developing skilled graduates to support the UK economy. The session will also give attendees an opportunity to consider how we as a supportive and collaborative community can respond to an ever-changing sector in a positive, agile and creative way.  

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will reflect on the importance of the broader context and its impact on specialist providers. 

– Delegates will explore best practice within this area. 

– Delegates will discuss opportunities to lead and engage in future meetings and workshops 

301: What is a professional services early careers network and why should your institution have one too? (30 minute presentation)

(Please note, this session will take place after the 30 minute session listed before this session)

Charlie Crofts, Graduate Management Trainee, University of Birmingham, Leyha Manampadi, Graduate Management Trainee, University of Birmingham, Emma Melling, Graduate Management Trainee, University of Birmingham

About the session:

The Professional Services Early Careers Network (PSEC) at the University of Birmingham is a pioneering staff network created in 2022. Many universities have established early career networks for academic researchers, however early careers professional services staff have not had the same staff networks. PSEC was established to enable professionals early in their careers to widen their horizons at the University. We have done this through increasing connections across the University and allowing our 300+ members to better understand working across a higher education institution.

While early careers are now variously defined, our network has aimed to unify those starting their career in Higher Education regardless of background. Universities are facing greater challenges with tight budgets and the lack of rising tuition fees. Therefore, our network is aiming to help those new to Higher Education understand the larger context of the world they are beginning to work in. We have already done this through our monthly Newsround sessions where our members review articles about current issues within Higher Education and how these affect us. The session we want to run will involve us sharing our experiences of setting up an early career professional services network and its importance to support members in understanding the political power a university has and the issues it faces in the coming year.

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working together and Engaging in the wider context

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will reflect on one approach to establishing an Early Career Professional Services Network through a case study and how it aims to support the growth of early careers networks at other Higher Education Institutions.

– Delegates will explore the benefits of an Early Career Professional Services Network in Higher Education, including benefits to the members, to line managers, and the institution as a whole

– Delegates will explore, using a case study, how an Early Careers Professional Services Network can create change.

302: Is Generative Artificial Intelligence (GenAI) for Me?: Live Interactive Demonstration (60 minute game/activity)

Danny Mirza, Lead Consultant/Head of Talent Team, Coventry University London/CU London

About the session:

In an era where technological advancements continuously reshape our professional landscapes, the integration of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and generative AI tools in our daily work routines offers unprecedented opportunities for enhancing productivity. This session is an innovative, 60-minute interactive workshop aimed at exploring the practical applications and time-saving potential of AI in diverse professional settings.

The session will commence with an introduction to the topic and the speaker, setting the stage for an engaging and informative journey into the realm of AI. Delegates, grouped into tables representing a mix of professions, will engage in a collaborative exploration of AI’s capabilities. This format ensures a rich diversity of perspectives and experiences, fostering a
comprehensive understanding of AI’s impact across various fields.

The core activity involves each group discussing their current stance on AI for 10 minutes, deliberating on its relevance and utility in their specific professional contexts. The groups will then propose a real-world task for the presenter to execute live using state-of-the-art AI and generative AI tools. This live demonstration serves as a practical and tangible showcase of AI’s efficiency and effectiveness in handling tasks that are part of the participants’ daily workloads.

Following the live task completion by the presenter, each group will assess and rate the potential time savings offered by AI in
their professional lives. The session will culminate in an insightful exercise where the collective time saved for each table is calculated and then aggregated. This final tally will project the total hours that could be reclaimed by the 50 participants, emphasizing the significant impact of AI in freeing up valuable time.

Through this interactive and dynamic session, participants will not only gain a deeper understanding of AI’s practical applications but also visualise its transformative potential in reclaiming time, a precious resource in our fast-paced world. This workshop promises to be a thought-provoking and experiential journey into the future of work, where AI acts as a catalyst for
efficiency, creativity, and personal growth.

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference stream: Being agile and adaptable

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will explore the practical applications of AI in professional settings

– Delegates will evaluate the time-saving potential of AI technologies:

– Delegates will explore the broader implications of integrating AI into their work routines, specifically how it can free up time for personal development, rest, and social activities.

303: Engaging Agility : Experience – Scrum and Kanban, Agile Frameworks through active simulations (Session 2) (60 exploratory wild card)

Please note, there is a first part of this session taking place in working session two. There is no requirement to attend both, however, they will be linked.

Karl Royle, Agile Coach, University of Nottingham, Taidhgh O’Regan, Product Director, University of Nottingham

About the session:

Agile ways of working are designed to respond to change during times of uncertainty and they advocate responding to change over following a plan. As such they are ideally placed to respond to political uncertainty and allowing fast pivoting to navigate the impact of external events. In the commercial world they are used to respond to competition and changes in the market conditions.

This session introduces the agile framework – Scrum through a hands-on interactive simulation. As the agile concept goes beyond software into university professional practice this session gives delegates an insight into self-organising teams and responding to change in a fast-moving environment. 

In this session, we will highlight the fundamentals of agility, drawing on the context of our Education, Administration, and Continuous Improvement team. Delegates will actively learn about agile values and principles by taking part in a Scrum team and experiencing the roles and events in Scrum practice.

The session will also have a series of cheat sheets and takeaways alongside instructions on how to run the simulations in their own contexts. 

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session also fits into the following conference stream: Being agile and adaptable and Working together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will experience a Scrum simulation, self organisation, prioritisation by value and teamworking through inspection and adaption
(self improvement)

– Delegates will develop a product and use Kanban to manage its production – including the principles and practices of Kanban through
group interaction and a worked example/simulation.

– Delegates will identify agile principles and frameworks, reflect on their potential use and plan an agile experiment within their institutions

304: Considering the bigger picture: The importance of Higher Education Policy for Professional Services (60 minute facilitated discussion)

Liam Conway, Associate Head of Regulatory Compliance, University of Bolton, Martin Lowe, Head of Policy Insight, University of Central Lancashire

About the session:

Developments in higher education history have always been driven by governmental and regulatory policy direction. From the Robbins Report, the introduction of tuition fees, to the recent creation of the Office for Students, higher education is shaped and impacted by governmental policy. Those individuals and institutions that have adapted quickest to the challenge of a changing sector, have often been the ones who have succeeded in the long term.
Understanding the context of a changing policy landscape, in any role within the sector, can give you the insight to contribute, innovate and progress further with your career. An awareness of how macro policy decision making has a direct impact on your service and the wider university, can give you a cutting edge in your career, a characteristic highly sought after across the sector.

This session will present the benefits of regularly keeping up to date with higher education policy changes, and how a deeper understanding of where key developments come from, and where they are heading to next, can lead to higher fulfilment within your current role and increase opportunities throughout your career.

The session aims to overview an ever-changing sector, the key policy decisions that had an impact on you today, and how an understanding of these issues can contribute to change in the workplace. It aims to give an opportunity for delegates to discuss how staying on top of sector changes can help them progress as higher education professionals, what mechanisms
are available to them, and how networking with colleagues across the country (and beyond) can deepen their insight and compliment their work.

This session intends to encourage recent graduates and early career professionals to embrace higher education, as much more than their current role, but as a vehicle to a rich and rewarding career that has endless avenues to take.

Conference Stream: Engaging with the wider context

This session fits into the following conference stream: Engaging with the wider context

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will identify the importance of higher education policy and its impact on all roles across the sector.

– Delegates will explore the importance of knowledge exchange between institutions and sectors to develop your university and yourself as a higher education professional.

– Delegates will explore the different routes for professional service staff to progress through their careers, with the help of an in-depth understanding of political and sector developments.

305: Peer reviewing demystified: a practical session teaching you how to peer review a journal article (and why you should do it!) (60 minute game/activity)

Mara Arts, Deputy Director of Student Administration (Operations), Imperial College London, Joanne Caldwell, School Business Manager, University of Salford

About the session:

This session introduces delegates to the process of peer reviewing journal articles. Led by members of the editorial board of Perspectives: Policy and Practice in Higher Education, this hands-on session explains what peer review is; why you may want to become a peer reviewer; and how to write a good review. Session participants will have the opportunity to see illustrative examples of reviews before getting stuck in themselves, and work together on writing a peer review of a sample article.

Within higher education, peer review of articles may seem an activity that is relevant to those working in academic roles. This session explains why peer review can be a valuable and rewarding development activity for those working in professional roles. It will explain the peer review process, as this can often seem opaque to those who do not regularly participate in academic publishing. The presenters will also unpack some of the benefits of becoming a peer reviewer.

Perspectives is a practitioner focused journal publishing articles on higher education management and practice. It is important
the articles are relevant to the members of AHEP, and as such, AHEP members are well placed to undertake reviews .

Attendees will be given some real-life examples of articles published in Perspectives, and the reviews that were given to them that improved their quality. This will clarify the components and hallmarks of a good review. For the second part of the session, attendees will work in small groups on a sample article, and work together to draft a review for this article. There will be an
opportunity to share learning with other delegates. At the end of the session, delegates will understand what a peer reviewer does; why peer reviewing can be a valuable development activity; and feel equipped to successfully review articles.

Conference Stream: Engaging with the wider context

This session fits into the following conference stream: Engaging with the Wider Context.

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will identify what the role of a peer reviewer entails

–  Delegates will explore the components of a good peer review

– Delegates will be equipped to undertake the peer review of an article for Perspectives

306: Harnessing Emotional Intelligence in an Hour: Navigating Political Uncertainty in Higher Education (60 minute exploratory workshop)

Eugene Walker, Lecturer, Immersion Coordinator and MBA Careers Lead, University College London

About the session:

In an era characterised by significant political shifts, particularly in the wake of the UK elections, the need for emotional intelligence (EI) in the academic workplace is paramount. This concise, one-hour interactive workshop, titled “Harnessing Emotional Intelligence in an Hour: Navigating Political Uncertainty in Higher Education,” aligns with the conference theme, ‘Pioneering through Political Uncertainty: Navigating the Impact of UK Elections on Higher Education.’ It offers a focused exploration into how EI can be effectively utilised to manage the challenges arising in the higher education sector due to these political changes. 

The workshop is tailored for higher education professionals who are grappling with the impacts of political uncertainty on their roles and institutions. Recognising the time constraint, the session is designed to be highly engaging and practical, providing participants with essential insights into EI and its relevance in the current political context. 

The session will kick off with a brief introduction to the concept of emotional intelligence, highlighting its five core components: self-awareness, self-regulation, motivation, empathy, and social skills. This segment will offer a quick self-assessment tool for participants to gauge their EI levels, facilitating an understanding of personal strengths and areas for development. 

Following this, the workshop will directly address the challenges posed by the UK’s political landscape. Through a combination of short presentations and interactive discussions, participants will examine how political uncertainty affects decision-making, staff morale, and student engagement in higher education. This segment aims to foster an understanding of how EI can be a strategic tool in navigating these challenges, ensuring effective leadership and collaboration amidst change. 

In the final part of the workshop, attendees will engage in scenario-based activities. These activities are designed to simulate real-life situations in higher education that have been impacted by political shifts. Participants will apply EI strategies to navigate these scenarios, focusing on empathetic communication, conflict resolution, and team cohesion. This practical application will empower attendees with actionable skills and insights that can be immediately implemented in their respective institutions. 

The workshop will conclude with a brief Q&A session, allowing participants to clarify concepts and discuss how to integrate EI strategies into their daily professional practices. 

Overall, this workshop aims to provide a rapid yet rich exploration of emotional intelligence in the context of political uncertainty in higher education, equipping participants with the essential tools to enhance their EI skills in a time-efficient manner. 

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference streams: Working together and Being agile and adaptable

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will employ a more extensive emotional vocabulary, able to identify, label and use a wider spectrum of emotions to describe their state in order to exercise greater control and accuracy for self-management and social awareness.

– Delegates will use listening vs assertiveness strategies to better maximise their interactions with others and develop stronger, more balanced working relationships.

– Delegates will recognise their triggers and blind spots, and be able to employ the STOPP Strategy to gain some distance between distressing thoughts and feelings, reduce the physical reaction of emotion/adrenaline at times of high stress, and help them to find some calmness to help them think more logically and rationally.

307: Collective Response: Navigating politics by breaking through institutional silos (60 minute facilitated discussion)

Aubrey Bierwirth, Internationalisation Coordinator, University of Glasgow, Adam Smith Business School, Andreea Tint, Student Mobility Coordinator, University of Glasgow, College of Arts

About the session:

As higher education professionals – in this context, specifically in the field of international education – we are often impacted by the decisions of our government and how it operates on a global stage, never too far from Politics with a capital P – and yet, often it is internal politics that most immediately impact our day-to-day operations and relationships. Using student
mobility as our specific context, we will dive into how we define, support and deliver our objectives through cross-functional collaboration in a large, complex organisation where institutional silos are long-established and difficult to overcome, as a basis for inviting participant discussion.

We are established but relatively early career professionals and would particularly encourage professional staff who or new or at a similar level, and who are interested in exploring and developing soft skills for navigating institutional politics, such as collaboration, problem-solving and conflict resolution. Often, we are not the decision makers and can therefore be caught by
competing or even opposing demands. How do we balance competing priorities and facilitate collaborative problem-solving? What is within our ability to control, influence, or accept?
We both have experience working in central services and now working at ‘School’ and ‘College’ levels. Through our experience with these three levels of our university’s organisation, we will present methods we have employed to build relationships across boundaries within the specific context of student mobility, which is by nature cross-collaborative (or, at
least, should be).

We will reference recent research into cross-functional collaboration, including resources for further reading, though the focus will be the facilitated discussion. We will encourage this first through a presentation of our own experiences followed by a reflective activity and group discussions.

Our experiences have shown us that intentional relationship maintenance and concerted efforts in building cross-functional connections are key to successfully navigating our own institutional politics. Interpersonal communication, conflict resolution, team working, and leadership skills have allowed us to wield influence and foster meaningful collaboration. Within our contexts, we have improved lines of communication, developed new resources, decreased duplication of effort, and built positive working relationships. While this has been successful, there is still room for improvement. We recognise the importance of self-reflection bolstered by peer support, and that the process of developing soft skills is one of continuous lifelong improvement.

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will describe immediate areas of control, influence and concern, using these to consider how they might balance competing priorities in a complex higher education environment with conflicting demands.

– Delegates will articulate essential soft skills in early career development for navigating institutional politics (e.g. communication, team working, and problem solving)

– Delegates will analyse and draw lessons from the presenters’ experiences in cross-collaboration in order to identify and apply effective approaches in their own contexts

308: The use of data to enhance programme improvement strategies across a large and diverse apprenticeship provision (60 minute case study)

Dean Marshall, Apprenticeship Officer, University of Cumbria, Paul Armstrong, Head of Apprenticeships & Employer Skills, University of Cumbria

About the session:

Attitudes towards apprenticeships have evolved over recent years and are increasingly recognised as a viable alternative route to university often opening doors to those who wouldn’t have considered university as an option. According to government apprenticeship and trainee figures (October 2023) 41,340 apprentices started degree apprenticeships to Bachelors (Level 6) and Masters (Level 7) standards in England during the academic year 2022/23. However, with this increase also comes greater complexity in delivery and a need to maintain key working relationships with external partners and employers.  

The university of Cumbria has been delivering apprenticeships since 2018 and currently supports over 2000 apprentices across 16 programme disciplines, with plans to further develop our portfolio to meet regional and national workforce needs. However, as the programme continues to grow so does the need to ensure our apprenticeship programmes are effective and efficient, so learner and employer experience is one of positivity with intended outcomes being achieved. 

In this session we aim to outline how we are making best use of data to drive forward programme improvement strategies and adapt a more robust administrative model that positively impacts learner progress and performance across a growing and diverse apprenticeship provision. In the session participants will consider how they can use a data driven approach to maintain and enhance employer relations through constructive conversations in a complex regularity environment.  

On attending this session, we aim to link the importance of data in improving student outcomes and retention rates and how employers can make best use of this as part of their recruitment strategies. The session will encourage delegates to consider the importance of employer relationships and the need to positively engage with a range of employers to meet the needs of the workforce of both today and the future. 

Conference Stream: Engaging with the wider context

This session fits into the following conference stream: Engaging with the wider context

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will identify how data can be used to make informed decisions and enhance service delivery 

– Delegates will appraise the benefits of working collaboratively and how collaboration can be used to support apprenticeship development and growth

– Delegates will identify how to make the best use of opportunities to enhance external relationships 

309: Cultivating Fortitude: Building a Strengths-Driven Culture in Uncertain Times delivered by Strengthify Ltd. (60 minute exploratory workshop)

Carley Brown, Consultant, Strengthify Ltd, Holger Bollmann, Director, Strengthify Ltd

About the session:

Fostering an engaging and motivating working environment in the face of external unpredictability has perhaps never been more challenging than in the post-pandemic era. In the higher education sector, managers are currently facing the complex task of navigating political uncertainty; balancing the need for strategic decision-making amidst changing policies with the crucial responsibility of providing steadfast support to their teams.

To navigate this turbulence, we invite higher education professionals to explore a paradigm shift which departs from problem-centric thinking and the traditional deficit-based model of fixating on weaknesses. Through adopting a strengths-based lens, managers and professionals can learn to amplify their inherent strengths and what’s is already working well within their organisations to boost resilience, motivation and performance. In this transformative approach, participants are encouraged to explore the unique talents, skills, and capabilities within themselves and their teams, leaving them better equipped to navigate the uncertainties of the higher education sector.

This interactive session serves as a guide for managers and individuals keen on initiating a strengths-based approach within their teams. Using empirical evidence, case studies and interactive exercises, participants are invited to build their understanding of the foundational principles of positive psychology and the benefits of adopting a strengths-based approach within higher education. Attendees will gain practical strategies for identifying and leveraging individual and collective strengths to cultivate higher engagement, innovation and performance at work.

Throughout the session, emphasis will be placed on practical applications and real-world examples to ensure participants leave with actionable insights. The goal is to inspire attendees to initiate the journey towards a strengths-based approach within their teams or organisations, fostering a positive and empowered workplace culture.

This thought-provoking and uplifting session is a must for managers eager to lead with impact in today’s ever-evolving work landscape, creating teams that thrive amidst challenges and unlock their full potential. Join us for an inspiring journey toward organisational excellence and heightened leadership effectiveness.

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference streams: Being agile and adaptable

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will develop a deep understanding of the strengths-based approach and its direct impact on team engagement and innovation.

– Delegates will understand how to systematically identify individual and collective strengths within their teams to improve engagement and performance.

– Delegates will explore practical strategies for embedding a strengths-based culture within your work.

310: Strategies for moving into and succeeding in senior leadership roles (60 minute exploratory workshop)

Hannah Rundle , Director of Faculty Operations (Humanities), University of Manchester

About the session:

Being agile and adaptable is key to moving into and succeeding in senior leadership roles. This session will look at the common challenges faced by leaders while applying for and transitioning into a new senior leadership role and share some strategies and ideas on succeeding in senior leadership roles, with thoughts and inputs collected from senior leaders across the sector. 

Building on this and linking to this year’s conference theme, the session will include reflections on the role of the senior leader in supporting their institution to continually adapt, thrive, and innovate regardless of the prevailing political landscape and how we might support our institutions to navigate the impact of UK elections on higher education. As well as some thoughts on the essential soft skills needed by senior managers to navigate the intricacies of organisational politics and how to navigate the multifaceted world of politics with a small ‘p.’ 

The session will encourage attendees to think creatively about their own personal experiences, encourage them to take ownership of their professional development in terms of succeeding in a senior leadership role as well as encouraging all participants to share their experiences and insights. 

There will be some honest and open reflections on how to thrive, not just survive! 

The topic will be of interest to HE professionals who are considering a move into a senior leadership role, or those who have recently moved into a senior leadership role. The workshop will provide some inputs, challenges and provocations to attendees as well as provide dedicated time for them to identify and reflect on the actions they need to personally take. 

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

The session will be guided by the AHEP values and link to the following areas of the AHEP professional development framework: Empowering professional development and Focusing on results and Taking Accountability 

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will engage with and sift through a range of ideas, reading and tips on transitioning into and succeeding in senior leadership roles and identify one or two areas they want to explore further.

– Delegates will reflect on their own personal journey into senior leadership roles and their priorities for their own personal practice to action following the conference.

– Delegates will have had an opportunity to network and engage with other aspiring or newly appointed senior leaders to share best practice and build their networks.


Activity and Refreshment Break
Time: 15:35 – 16:15
Location: Mead Gallery and Warwick Arts Centre foyer

Panel: Diversity and Inclusion in Higher Education Professional Services: Attracting and Retaining the People we Need sponsored by Gatenby Sanderson
Time: 16:15-17:00
Location: Arts Centre Theatre, Warwick Arts Centre, 1st Floor

Diversity and Inclusion in Higher Education Professional Services: Attracting and Retaining the People we Need

Sponsored by:

About the session

Join our insightful panel session, where we navigate the intricate landscape of diversity within higher education professional services against the backdrop of political uncertainty. Addressing the impact of the UK election on higher education, our expert speakers will explore structural, policy, and practical barriers that affect the career progression, retention, and attraction of a diverse workforce, encompassing how intersectionality impacts staff experience. Discover pioneering strategies that empower institutions to thrive in the face of uncertainty, fostering an inclusive environment that attracts and retains the diverse talent essential for the future of higher education. 

Dr Arun Verma, Head of Inclusion, University of London

About Arun

Dr Arun Verma is a leading figure in implementing and integrating intersectionality in systems, policy and programmes both nationally and internationally. He is a Head of Inclusion at the University of London and Fellow of the RSA. He completed his doctorate exploring intersectionality in healthcare students’ learning, retention and success. He has led the integration and embedding of intersectionality and anti-racist practice in local government commissioning, national and global programmes, policy development, practice and implementation. He has been granted a number of awards facilitating his impact including being recently nominated as Diversity and Inclusion Leader 2022 by d&i leaders. He holds a number of board roles facilitating constructively disruptive conversations about inclusion across the sector and his edited collection ‘Anti-racism in higher education: An action guide for change’ is accelerating action for inclusion in higher education

Christina Hughes, Founder and CEO of Women-Space Leadership

About Christina

Christina is Founder and CEO of Women-Space Leadership which supports women who work in universities to flourish.  Such has been the success, and need, for work in this area Christina has recently launched Women-Space Australia.   

Christina established Women-Space after a long career in academic and executive roles in the University sector.  She was Pro-Vice-Chancellor at the University of Warwick, Provost at Sheffield Hallam University and Deputy-Vice-Chancellor (Interim) at the University of Kent.  She is a published author, with 17 books to her name and a Professor of Women and Gender.  Christina has served as a Governor on the Board of Leeds Beckett University and has held trustee roles for Villiers Park Educational Trust and the Royal Society of Arts Academies.   

She is an Honorary Professor at the University of Kent, a Visiting Professor at Coventry University, Honorary Professor of the Warwick International Higher Education Academy and holds honorary life membership of the Gender and Education Association that she established with colleagues and is now a registered charity. 

Contact:  christina@women-space.co.uk 

LinkedInhttps://www.linkedin.com/in/christinahugheswomen-space/ 

Twitter:  HughesHughes8 

Naina Patel, Chief People Officer, University of the Arts London

About Naina

Naina is the Chief People Officer at the University of the Arts London.  As a member of the Executive Board she she contributes to the strategic development and effective leadership of the university.  She leads the Human Resources and Health and Safety functions, and on equality, diversity and inclusion and wellbeing.  She is currently UAL’s Race Champion with responsibility for the anti-racism strategy.  She joined UAL in January 2015 as HR Director.

Prior to that Naina was HR Director at Birkbeck, University of London and has also held HR roles at Queen Mary, University of London and in the NHS.

Naina is a Fellow of the Chartered Institute of Personnel Development, a trained coach and holds a social sciences degree.

She has held non-executive  roles in education at primary, secondary and further education level, a management consultancy, and is a trustee at London Universities Purchasing Consortium and the Council for At Risk Academics.  Naina plays an active role in the sector and is currently Chair of Universities HR (UHR) and a long standing member of the Executive Committee, having previously chaired the UHR M25 Group.  She serves on various working groups, including the Higher Education National Pay Negotiations Committee and the AdvanceHE Strategic Leadership and Development Advisory Group.

Tessa Harrison, Partner (Higher Education), Gatenby Sanderson

About Tessa

Tessa is a Partner in GatenbySanderson’s Education Practice. Before joining GatenbySanderson in 2020, Tessa held HE senior leadership and management roles in a career spanning over 30 years in five universities ranged across the sector mission groups.  Between 2014 and 2016, she was Chair of the Association of University Administrators (AUA) following a number of years as a Trustee on the AUA Board. She also served as an appointed member of the Board of the Leadership Foundation for HE. She is a graduate of Liverpool Polytechnic with a PGDip from Anglia Polytechnic University; an Associate of King’s College London and a graduate of the AOC accredited Meyler Campbell Business Coaching Programme.  In her role with GatenbySanderson, Tessa partners with universities to recruit Vice Chancellors and other senior academic and professional services leaders.

Tessa is the convenor of the Higher Diversity Coalition, a cross sector coalition set up to tackle the lack of ethnic diversity in academic and student services leadership through a four-point plan covering data; recruitment, progression and recruitment; storytelling and development programmes. The coalition includes representatives from ARC, AGCAS, AHEP, AMOSSHE, AHUA, HESPA, SCONUL, UHR and Shakespeare Martinea. 


Conference Dinner

Conference Dinner
Time: 19:00-00:00
Location: Rootes Building

Join us at the University of Warwick for the conference dinner on the evening of Monday, 25 March. Enjoy a two-course meal, followed by a dessert and afterparty.

Our dress code encourages you to embrace both comfort and style. The goal is to create an atmosphere where you feel good, both in what you wear and the company you keep.

We look forward to seeing you there!


Tuesday, 26 March 2024

Registration and Refreshments
Time: 08:00-09:30
Location: Registration and Information Desk, Warwick Arts Centre foyer

Keynote Address: Rajani Naidoo, The Contribution of Higher Education to the Common Good
Time: 09:30-10:15
Location: Arts Centre Theatre, Warwick Arts Centre, 1st Floor

The Contribution of Higher Education to the Common Good

Rajani Naidoo, UNESCO Chair, Deputy Vice-Chancellor, People and Culture, University of Exeter

Further detail on this session to be released soon!

About Rajani

Professor Rajani Naidoo is Vice-President and Deputy Vice-Chancellor (People and Culture) at the University of Exeter, with responsibility for driving a step change in Exeter’s culture and inclusion priorities within the context of a high performing institution. Before this she was Vice-President (Community and Inclusion) at the University of Bath and Head of the Race Equality Taskforce.

 At Bath, she was also Co-Director of the International Centre for Higher Education Management and UNESCO Chair. She led the Doctor of Business Administration in Higher Education Management to a global reputation, attracting higher education professionals and leaders from more than 60 countries, and the Future Leaders Initiative, a unique doctoral programme in partnership with the South African government, the British Council and Nelson Mandela University to build leadership capacity in South Africa. She started her career as an inaugural member of staff at Khanya, a South African institution which acted as a model for the transformation of post-apartheid higher education.

Her research focusses on the influence of global, national, and organisational forces on research, teaching, and the wider role of the university in society. She is particularly interested in social justice, competition and collaboration and how higher education can contribute to the global good.

She is featured in the Stanford/Elsevier top 2 per cent most highly cited scholars in her field, has been involved in many multi-national research projects and has presented numerous keynotes across many countries.  

She is Visiting Professor at Nelson Mandela University in South Africa, and sits on advisory committees for organisations including the British Council and the European Foundation for Management Development.


Working Session 4

Tuesday, 26 March from 10:20-11:20

Delegates can choose one working session per session slot excluding sessions where there are multiple sessions in a slot.

401: The future of the Change Special Interest Group (60 minute facilitated discussion/exploratory workshop)

Luke Phillimore, Associate Director of Change, University of Nottingham, Daniel Black, Online Programmes Team Leader, University of Liverpool

About the session:

Come and meet the Change Special Interest Group and help us set a future vision and scope for the group. This is the largest AHEP SIG and it’s time to wake the sleeping giant so that it can add value to you, your institutions and the wider sector. 

During the session there will be some scene setting before using the time to connect with other Change colleagues, discuss the issues and opportunities we are all facing before identifying key actions that the SIG can do to enable positive change in the sector…… 

  • The long history of Higher Education in the UK 
  • Consider the impact of COVID and the legacy its left 
  • The financial uncertainty the sector is in 
  • The upcoming General Election and what a change in government may cause 

 
This will be an interactive session where you can help steer this important SIG – we aim to have you walk away feeling invigorated about the opportunities ahead and ready to face the challenges with a smile on your face 
 
All are welcome to join us for a stimulating and engaging discussion! 

Conference Stream: Working Together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working together, Being agile and adaptable and Engaging in the wider context

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will collaborate in creation of the Change SIG vision 

– Delegates will communicate with higher education Change professionals 

– Delegates can develop their understanding of what the Change SIG can offer

402: Advancing inclusive service delivery: A matrix based strategy for diverse access (60 minute facilitated discussion)

Sara Murcott, Student Services Manager, Nottingham Trent University, Dr Gwyn Eanor, Student Support Coordinator, Nottingham Trent University

About the session:

This session will demonstrate how multiple services can come together to deliver a seamless student-facing service. Our collaborative approach to service delivery brings together internal partners, as well as external third sector organisations in an approach recognised by the OfS as being key to increased equality of opportunity.

Students will often need input from multiple specialist services to enable them to navigate HE in the current climate of an increase in mental health and wellbeing support needs, the impact of the cost of living crisis and changes to the student visa programme. We will demonstrate the value of our approach in providing a single front door for students which can provide tailored advice and guidance and coordinate their access to specialist teams where appropriate.  Our PATHways approach offers both a drop-in and appointment based service, available to all students who can, and do, present about anything and everything.

We carried out desk-top research into this topic by exploring if and where other comparable services exist within the HE sector. We investigated and tested this idea, both in the early stages of the previous iteration of the service (known as ‘triage’), when it funded via an Investment Fund Bid provided by our VC. We did so again more recently, before the re-launch in the Summer of 2022. We tested our ideas with our customer-base, via staff consultation and student feedback. 

From our research, we learnt that although there are some variations on a theme of this service provision, no other competitor seems to be able to demonstrate the impact of the service in its accessibility across the broad range of the student population, based on a such a collaborative approach of service delivery. 

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference stream: Being agile and adaptable and Working together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will be able to identify the benefits (and pitfalls) of a matrix approach to service delivery

– Delegates will be able to gain an insight into the added value for staff and students of working together in an agile way. 

– Delegates will be able to assess if the PATHways approach to service delivery is the way forward for them in offering a non-stigmatising service, open to all. 

403: Awarding gaps, grade inflation and the impact of no-detriment policies during COVID-19 (60 minute wild card)

Erica Brackenbury, Quality Manager, University of Roehampton 

About the session:

The session presents research which indicates that the Office for Students’ (OfS) statistical model for identifying ‘unexplained’ attainment intrinsically embeds harmful expectations about the academic performance of students from lower socioeconomic backgrounds and minoritised ethnic groups. Increased attainment within these groups is disproportionately branded as ‘grade inflation’, most habitually when in attendance at lower-tariff universities. This ideological position is fundamentally incompatible with the OfS obligation to “improve equality of opportunity for underrepresented groups to access, succeed in and progress from higher education.”

This workshop will highlight the challenges faced by universities with the most diverse groups of students when tackling the ideas of ‘grade inflation’. The key idea presented within this session is that the rise in attainment during COVID-19 and related no-detriment policies was not ‘grade inflation’ but the removal of the deficit model, allowing students to perform to their abilities without artificial barriers being presented.  Delegates are encouraged to think how elements of no-detriment policies can be utilised in future practice to support students with significant challenges in accessing and thriving in university.

This research was undertaken as part of my MA dissertation at Bath Spa, for which I was awarded a distinction. It has been through thorough ethical approval processes and is based upon mixed-methods research, utilising publicly available data, FOI requests to institutions and semi-structured interviews with participants working within academic and professional roles in universities. These various datapoints were used to triangulate and support the findings of the research project.

The data presented by the OfS in support of the narrative of grade inflation is misleading, the lack of transparency making it difficult to draw conclusions. Utilising statistical analysis, I have found significant correlations between the prevalence of specific demographic groups at institutions and increased rates of ‘grade inflation’. No-detriment policies and practice during COVID-19 significantly reduced the ethnicity awarding gap, though the picture is more complex when data is disaggregated
into specific ethnic groups. Universities should consider maintaining some of these principles post-COVID, to support students in their university journey.

The workshop will be run as a world café, with an initial presentation briefly summarising my research before delegates are split into groups to discuss the topics raised. Delegates will also have the opportunity to feedback their discussion, considering what methods can be implemented in universities to help tackle the awarding gap for certain groups.

Conference Stream: Demonstrating Responsible Practice and Personal Integrity

This session fits into the following conference stream: Demonstrating responsible practice and personal integrity and Engaging with the wider context

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will be able to analyse the inequities embedded within the OfS model of grade inflation

– Delegates will consider what mitigations can be implemented within your own institution to support students from a diverse range of backgrounds to succeed in higher education.

– Delegates will evaluate the effects of no-detriment policies upon different demographic groups.

404: From Whitehall to the whiteboard – quality professionals, what do we need them for? (60 exploratory workshop)

Fran Mckay, Academic Quality Manager, Nottingham Trent University

About the session:

Change makers, agitators, critical friends. Words not often heard in the same sentence as ‘quality professional’. But are we missing a trick?

Historically considered a ‘support function’, the identity and impact of quality professionals remains criminally under-theorised. And yet, these colleagues are increasingly leant on to capture, interpret and pivot to meet policy formed by our outputs-driven regulator.

Framed within the political context of the upcoming general election, this session will encourage participants to consider the evolving responsibilities and competencies of those regularly navigating the space between government and teaching. From consulting and chairing, to writing and negotiating, the workshop will bring AHEP’s values of increasing collaboration and inclusivity within the HE workforce to life.

By the end of the workshop, participants will have questioned the limiting belief that quality is “simply” ‘administration’, and gained insights into how we can realistically continue to develop colleagues bridging the gap in an increasingly observed, diverse and complex political environment.

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference stream: Being agile and adaptable.

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will explore the changing role of quality and policy professionals in higher education institutions (HEIs). These groups of colleagues often remain under-valued ‘clerks’ and yet are highly influential in the change, and increasingly innovation, landscape within HEIs.

– Delegates will develop a forward-thinking mindset to anticipate and, therefore, prepare for future challenges in the skillsets of their teams and colleagues.

– Delegates will consider how to more effectively resource, plan and develop staff who are responsible for curating academic policy alongside students and academic staff. Attendees will leave with a digital ‘time capsule’ with some actionable steps to either facilitate the development of their teams or influence their own development plans.

405: #HigherEducationPostcard: how today’s higher education sector reflects past political, social and economic change (and what this might mean for you) (60 minute facilitated discussion)

Hugh Jones, Senior Consultant, Hugh Jones Consulting

About the session:

This session will explore how the HE sector in the UK has developed over time, in response to changing political, social and economic pressures, illustrating the discussion with vintage postcards showing scenes for higher education.

The presentation will help to illustrate how broader societal change impacts upon higher education, helping participants understand and contextualise the relevance of current political discourses.

Universities are long-run institutions: understanding their historical context helps higher education professionals more effectively respond to, and shape, the present. This session will enable professional staff within higher education to better understand the history of the higher education sector and their own institution. This will help people to better understand strategy and policy within their institution, as well as better understanding
organisational cultures and values.

The higher education sector has always developed to meet societal needs, whether for particular industries or trades/professionals, or for greater social inclusion (eg women’s access to higher education). This understanding enables one to better anticipate future developments.

Conference Stream: Engaging with the wider context

This session fits into the following conference stream: Engaging with the wider context

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will examine the historical development of the UK HE sector

– Delegates will explore how values and culture shape higher education institutions

– Delegates will locate their own institutions within the broader context, enabling a better understanding of organisational culture and values

406: Demystifying Higher Education Governance: What does the future hold? (60 minute facilitated discussion)

Dan Tinkler, Governance Development Manager, Advance HE, Colette Fletcher, Head of Governance and Consulting, Advance HE, Nina Langlie, Strategic Consultancy Manager, Advance HE

About the session:

Good governance is critical to success in higher education. In today’s turbulent environment all HE providers need high-performing boards that are equipped to determine the strategic course of the organisation, safeguard its sustainability, and assure standards. Governance in higher education must respond to and proactively plan for wider political and policy developments that may result in a change of direction for the higher education sector, institutional strategy, and impact on professional services staff at all stages of their career. Recent examples include the change from a higher education funder to
a higher education regulator in England, the change to a tertiary model in Wales.

This session will build upon the findings of Advance HE’s 60+ governance effectiveness reviews over the past 5 years to present the key findings, share unique trends in self-reporting benchmarking data, our recent collaborative work with Universities UK, GuildHE and the Committee of University Chairs on academic assurance and examine the diversity of governing bodies in higher education from our sector leading Diversity of Governing Bodies in HE Report. It will build on Advance HE’s understanding of wider political and policy developments and where that will have implications for higher education governance.

The session will place recent developments in line with future potential developments spurred on by examining trends in the higher education sector that will ask participants to scenario plan based on potential future developments in the medium to longer term. Delegates will get the chance to work together in small groups to design and respond to future scenarios and
how they would design and imagine university systems and processes to meet future needs. It will support early career professionals to understand what good governance looks like and how it may develop. It will be of particular interest for those who wish to progress to management or senior management positions and will need to consider how to work within higher education governance to support career development.

The session will aim to demystify higher education governance, the behaviours, cultures and values that define it alongside the enabling structures and processes that support it. The session will provide delegates with a chance to reimagine where things may need to change and develop across multiple scenarios driven by wider sector context and political developments
and how governance can impact across the whole university.

Conference Stream: Engaging with the wider context

This session fits into the following conference stream: Engaging with the Wider Context.

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will develop an awareness of corporate and academic governance in universities and the systems and
processes that support them.

–  Delegates will explore key trends in higher education governance, including external political influence, and where this may develop in the future

– Delegates will have a greater understanding of University governance and where it has the potential to interact and impact across all levels of career stages within higher education.

407: Thriving in turbulent times: the agile mindset (60 minute exploratory workshop)

Please note, this session is now fully booked. Due to popularity, we are also running this session on Monday, 25 March from 10:00-11:00.

Helen Curtis, School Manager, University of Bristol Imogen Debonnaire, Senior Executive Assistant, University of Bristol

About the session:

“The world today is every bit as turbulent as the storm… Leaders and their organisations, must have the ability to respond creatively to unpredictable challenges and opportunities. The need for agility has never been greater” (Oliver et al. 2021). 

This workshop will explore the theme of being agile and adaptable and will help delegates to understand how they can adopt an agile business model to thrive in turbulent times, seeing problems as opportunities for creative thinking and innovation. 

Organisations who are adopting agile working practices have a 75% chance of success with only a 30% success rate for those that don’t (McKinsey, 2021). Businesses all over the globe are adopting more agile approaches, such as flatter structures, smaller teams, and empowering staff at the lowest level. In contrast, higher education (HE) is a sector steeped in tradition, highly regulated with hierarchies and bureaucracy strongly embedded. How do we as leaders help our organisations transition to being agile, to ensure successful service delivery in this changing climate? 

This workshop will begin with an overview of agile leadership and embedding the agile business model, using a case-study approach to provide practical examples of how to apply agile approaches to improve service delivery. The case will be on changes made in a Medical School to support career development, meet evolving operational demands whilst underpinning the organisations values of EDI and sustainability. The speaker will introduce the concepts of agile working and share their own journey on developing an agile mindset.  

Drawing on the literature on agile leadership and business models, delegates will build an understanding of basic theory and how to apply it in their context. Examples will include embedding job-shares to support women progressing, the introduction of the apprentice scheme to increase social mobility and introducing the first sustainability technician in the UK. By using practical examples of theory applied in a HE setting, delegates will be able to translate agile leadership into their everyday, through creative thinking. Delegates will then have a group discussion on how to embed agile working into their own context. 

Conference Stream: Being agile and adaptable

This session fits into the following conference streams: Being agile and adaptable and Working Together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will build a basic understanding of agile leadership as a business model and understand how to apply it in their local context.

– Delegates will reflect on their own leadership/ management journey and explore how to move forward to embrace an agile mindset. 

– Delegates will explore how agile principles can be applied in a Higher Education setting and will have practical steps to take away with them.

408: Let’s put staff belonging top of the agenda: creation of an action learning set scheme for professional staff in student experience and engagement roles (60 minute wild card)

David Gilani, Head of Student Engagement and Advocacy, Middlesex University, Siobhan Dumphy, Head of Student Engagement and Advocacy, Canterbury Christ Church University, Chris Whitehead, Communications Lead (Seamless Student Journey programme), University of Surrey

About the session:

Given the prevalence of discussions around student belonging within the sector in recent years, it’s easy to overlook the need that we all have as professional staff to feel a sense of belonging in our universities. Staff belonging can be a challenge for many different reasons. Some staff will be new to their institution, job role or higher education altogether and may not know
yet how they fit in. Other staff may be located in areas of their university which mean that they don’t really have a ‘team’ around them to connect with. Some more senior staff may be facing new challenges and no longer have peers at their level to share these issues with.

To address the importance of staff belonging and come together to counter staff isolation, the Student Experience and Engagement Special Interest Group is developing an action learning set scheme for anyone involved with the network. This session will act as the official in-person launch for the action learning sets – a practice commonly used in many professional
development programmes to bring together participants to help collectively problem solve and enhance connections.

This session itself will split into two halves. The beginning of this session will feature an introduction from the Special Interest Group team. This introduction will feature some insights into the literature around student and staff belonging and the connections between the two, as well as practicalities for how the action learning set scheme will run. The second half of the session will then be focused on initial conversations within action learning sets, so that delegates will get an opportunity to meet each other in person.

To ensure that we can make the best use of the time in this session, all delegates will be required to register for the session in advance, so that action learning sets can be established that take into account delegates institutions and areas of work.

The action learning set scheme will then continue beyond the AHEP Annual Conference. The Student Experience and Engagement SIG will provide resources to all action learning sets, to help encourage ongoing connection.

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working Together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will gain a clear understanding of how belonging amongst staff is crucial for effective universities and for the wellbeing of each of us.

– Delegates will explore the purpose of an action learning set and the basic rules of engagement to make sure that all participants benefit.

– Delegates will establish who will be in their action learning set and how to engage with others in their set:

409: Just how should we manage change in the sector? (60 minute facilitated discussion)

Vikki Goddard, Managing Consultant, AHEP, Sara Corcoran, Lead Consultant, AHEP

About the session:

Change is a constant in the HE sector, yet everyone has an anecdote or an apocryphal story of when change went wrong in their organisation. We are bombarded with methodologies, process improvement techniques and analysis. We are all encouraged to be flexible/agile/adaptable/resilient – whatever buzzword you dress it up as, one thing is certain – change and the drive for more efficiency and effectiveness across Universities and particularly in professional services, is not going away.

This session is intended to give an opportunity to reflect on the realities of managing and being involved in change and change programmes in complex environments. It will explore, at a high level, some of the different approaches that have been used in the sector, and reflect on the pros and cons of these, based on the experiences of two consultants who have recently been senior managers in Universities.

The areas that will be covered include:
• Planning, delivery and success
• Consultants: their role in the process
• Organisational culture and how it impacts on change programmes
• Change support structures: offices, teams and governance

This is intended to be an interactive session where delegates are encouraged to share and reflect on their own experiences of change, what has worked well and the challenges faced in Institutions.

Conference Stream: Working together

This session fits into the following conference stream: Working together

Learning Objectives:

– Delegates will identify different approaches to change and recognise the benefits and challenges these might bring

– Delegates will reflect on what would work well within their own Institutional culture

– Delegates will be able to take a more informed view of what is happening in different institutions and take back ideas to their own institutions with reference to the experience of other participants


Refreshment Break
Time: 11:20-11:40
Location: Mead Gallery and Warwick Arts Centre foyer

Panel: Is it time to stop elevating higher education and think tertiary?  
Time: 11:40-12:40
Location: Arts Centre Theatre, Warwick Arts Centre, 1st Floor

Is it time to stop elevating higher education and think tertiary? Panel Session

About the session

In a dynamic exploration of the multifaceted tertiary sector in the United Kingdom, we dissect regional variations in Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland. 

The panel responds to the potential game-changer: the government’s Lifelong Learning Entitlement (LLE). Join us as we unravel the implications of LLE for higher education’s role in this transformative landscape. We’ll question the traditional notion of ‘higher’ education, considering if a degree can be the sum of its teaching parts through modular learning. 

Delving into regional distinctions, we spotlight the LLE’s potential to reshape post-18 education in England. The discussion extends to the repercussions for higher education institutions, urging them to think innovatively about education delivery and fostering collaboration with further and alternative education providers. 

At the heart of this dialogue is the pivotal role of HE professionals. Engage with us as we explore how your active involvement in policy implementation ensures our higher education system is not just adaptable but thriving in the face of future challenges. 

Helena Vine, Policy and Public Affairs Officer, Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education (QAA)

About Helena

Helena Vine is Policy and Public Affairs Officer at the Quality Assurance Agency for Higher Education, working predominantly on the English policy landscape. She previously led higher education policy at youth charity Impetus, and before that completed the Charityworks graduate scheme.

Xenia Levantis, Chair of Student Strategic Advisory Committee, QAA

About
Xenia

Xenia Levantis is completing a PhD in Social Policy, funded by the ESRC, at the University of Bristol. Her research examines contemporary uses of knowledge in English higher education policymaking. Xenia is trustee of QAA and University of Bristol. She is the former President of Norwich University of the Arts SU and a past member of the OfS student panel and Bristol SU trustee board. Outside her studies, she is involved in various cooperative societies including Bristol Student Housing Cooperative.

Joy Elliott-Bowman, Director of Policy & Development, Independent Higher Education

About
Joy

Joy Elliott-Bowman is the Director of Policy and Development at Independent Higher Education. She leads IHE’s policy development, advocacy and member support as well as facilitating good practice across the independent sector. She has over 20 years of experience in British and Canadian higher education, working from within universities, independent providers, students’ unions, and national student and higher education sector organisations. She has led IHE’s support for the APPG for International Students since its inception in 2016. While working across all aspects of higher education policy, Joy has a specific interest in quality and innovation in both higher education and skills, student engagement, and international education policy. 

Iestyn Davies, Pro-Vice Chancellor, University of Wales Trinity Saint David

About
Iestyn

Keynote: Professor Damien Page, Working class leaders in Higher Education: journeys, challenges and opportunities
Time: 12:40-13:25
Location: Arts Centre Theatre, Warwick Arts Centre, 1st Floor

Working class leaders in Higher Education: journeys, challenges and opportunities

Professor Damien Page, Deputy Vice Chancellor, Buckinghamshire New University

About the session

Despite being deeply entrenched with higher education, the issue of class is rarely acknowledged and even more rarely discussed. This session will reflect on my personal journey from a traditional working class background to executive leadership, drawing out the challenges faced by many colleagues in the university sector. But it will also be hopeful, foregrounding the potential of a collective approach and the aims of the new Working Class Leaders in Higher Education Network and how it can support career progression for academic and professional service colleagues and increase the number of working class leaders within the sector.

About Damien

Before joining Buckinghamshire New University as Deputy Vice Chancellor in 2023, I had various roles in advertising and recruitment. I began my education career in Further Education, working as a Lecturer at Lewisham College teaching English and communications before moving into leadership, overseeing a diverse set of courses, from Access to entry level construction as well as leading e-learning innovations such as the Academy of e-Business.

I then joined Linking London Lifelong Learning Network at Birkbeck, University of London, forging progression routes between FE and HE and commissioning teaching and transition innovation projects, before joining the University of Greenwich as a Senior Lecturer in post-compulsory teacher education. After progressing to Head of Department of Education and Community Studies, I was then appointed as Dean of the Carnegie School of Education at Leeds Beckett University, creating a strategy founded upon social justice and inclusion.

I then became Dean of the Faculty of Education, Health and Wellbeing at the University of Wolverhampton, a full member of the university Executive, as well as being the Executive Lead for research and Knowledge Exchange. I’m also an active researcher specialising in organisational behaviour in education settings.

Lunch and Networking
Time: 13:25 – 15:30
Location: Mead Gallery and Warwick Arts Centre foyer


We look forward to welcoming you to the AHEP Annual Conference and Exhibition in March!

If you have any questions, please contact events@ahep.ac.uk and a member of the events team will be available to assist.